The Shifty Captive: Shelton “Shifty” Sharpe

Shelton “Shifty” Sharpe

Is the first person you’ll meet in “The Shifty Captive.”

Name: Shelton “Shifty” Sharpe
Age: 21
Nationality: Ilan
Height: 5’10”
Weight: 180
Race: Caucasian
Eye Color: Grey like water
Hair Color: Ginger
Occupation: clerk, freelance procurer, conman, captive, minion-throughout Shifty Captive
“I’ve committed many deeds I regret in service to my master…”





Book Release: The Shifty Captive

11/21/17: Update the page for The Shifty Captive is now live.  Clicking on the cover will take you to your country’s Amazon page.

Shelton “Shifty” Sharpe is the shiftiest member in the magic trade, and this is how he gets his start.  Canadians can buy print version if they prefer here.

I will be releasing  profiles with portraits of  The Shifty Captive characters every Monday in order of their appearance.


The Girl Who Played with Fire by Steig Larsson

3 out of 5

Lisbeth is accused of murder, and takes it too casually throughout most of a long book.She feels untouchable because of her intelligence and her recently acquired wealth, and spends most of her time waiting things out. Thanks to her hubris that she ends up paying for it when she’s gravely injured by the end of the book. It feels like I’m supposed to feel sorry for her, but I think she should’ve kept on top of things and not let it get so far. I would’ve rated it lower if she didn’t become more proactive at the end.


Things it’d be Cool to See in New Fantasy Stories for November 9, 2017

I found there’s still room for magic in a hi-tech world as it gives people tools for exploration they didn’t have in earlier ages.

see what I mean here


The First Men in the Moon by H.G. Wells

4 out of 5

This must’ve been the earliest examples of hard sci-fi. H.G. Wells did the best he could with what information we had. Though we now know the moon is uninhabited and the race he came up for it is unrealistic. He did do a good job illustrating the culture shock and intricacies of socializing with an alien culture. The protagonist goes for what seems like a simple travel adventure experience and then is overwhelmed at the thought of being the representative of his planet to an alien culture. Ethnocentrism is shown when he thinks Europeans “improved” the New World, and voices agreement withe the concept of “The White Men’s Burden.” This makes it is comical when
he is flustered by a culture he considers superior to his own. It’s like reading the travelogue of an ethical space tourist.