Movie Review: Solo: A Star Wars Story

4 out of 5

Solo: A Star Wars Story is the comfort food of the scifi world. Meaning that its fans are fussy and demanding. People don’t appreciate the skill shown when you deliver a pleasing product yet will be quick to tell you when you’re off. There is some room for seasonings and flavorings but it’s very narrow. I was worried after I saw the Last Jedi but I liked this movie.

Alden Ehrenreich does a credible job despite the fears of the fans. People are quick to call anyone who is cast as a character as iconic as Han Solo and follows after a star as charismatic as Harrison Ford “cocky.” However, that’s what’s called for in the character. I am a fan of the OT myself but does anyone want to see Han Solo’s antics in an old age home?

It’s almost too bad Han didn’t wear a mask. Masked Star Wars characters are allowed to have multiple actors in the role without irritating the fans. Darth Vader has had different physical and voice actors. The Chewie suit is now worn by a younger man.

I’m a fan of comfort food, so I give this movie 4 out of 5. It’s a credible addition to the Star Wars cannon and I’m a Star Wars fan. Some people may prefer a more cutting edge production but there’re newer franchises for that.

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Star Wars the Story We Don’t Want to Die

Star Wars is a modern myth that resonates with and is beloved by the modern world. People have been complaining about the quality of the latest offerings of the Star Wars universe. Even its most dedicated fans say the are pale shadows of the original movies. Yet I find useful lessons in creativity from both its strengths and flaws.
Sometimes a franchise is so popular that fans are willing to wait out bad decisions and missteps and wait until more canny management comes up with better products.
So far it’s most dynamic character is Darth Vader who even survived the mischaracterization of being a whiny brat in the prequels. I wish George Lucas had made young Anakin as charismatic as Darth Vader. Yet I saw people still cheer him on in Rogue One, which goes to prove that myth is resilient in whatever form it takes.